April 2009

14 April 2009

Drawn to be wilder

Drawn to be wilder

rian hughes

Rian Hughes explores magazine hand-lettering in the latest issue of Eye
Custom type was not an occasional indulgent art in the pre-digital dark ages, it was the norm, says Rian Hughes in ‘Drawn to be wild’ (Eye no. 71 vol. 18).

14 April 2009

Golden age of type blogs?

Golden age of type blogs?

the type department

A whistle-stop tour through the top ten typographic weblogs
Here, at last, is our Easter week type special: the top ten type blogs, chosen by an anonymous panel of industry experts using strictly scientific principles (honest).

9 April 2009

Out of the Fog and into the Fab

Out of the Fog and into the Fab

jan middendorp

Robothon 2009’s hi-tech type tools give automation to the superfamilies
Only a few decades ago, a conference about new developments in typographic technology would have been attended by men in suits and ties discussing hardware with six-digit prices, writes Jan Middendorp. Typefaces back then were expensive, platform-dependent machine parts.

8 April 2009

Cutting some Slack for the AR

Cutting some Slack for the AR

simon esterson

A framework that’s more than just a (projected) shadow of its former self
The Architectural Review, the 113-year-old monthly known simply as ‘the AR’ by its visually aware audience, has had a tough time of it over the past few years, writes Simon Esterson. Changes in ownership and a loss of design direction left it looking like an also-ran in a field it once dominated. I’ve been a keen follower of the AR since its Manplan issues (see Eye no. 54 vol. 14) sparked my interest in both architecture and magazine design in the school art room nearly 40 years ago, so it is very encouraging to see the redesigned April issue emerge phoenix-like from the inferno that is contemporary magazine publishing.

7 April 2009

Curwen on the Stone(s)

Curwen on the Stone(s)

the picture department

Pasche’s rock’n’roll posters get the fine printing treatment
Designer John Pasche writes to tell us that his celebrated Rolling Stones posters (see Two degrees of (colour) separation, Eye Blog, September 2008) are available from his new website, rollingstonesposters.co.uk.

6 April 2009

Golden Age of type? Or the dark ages?

Golden Age of type? Or the dark ages?

the type department

Eye’s type special nominates the faces of the moment. Now name yours
In ‘Golden age?’ (Eye no. 71 vol. 18), we asked twelve practitioners – art directors, type designers, educators – to suggest examples of typefaces that characterise the Zeitgeist, and show some of their nominated fonts. Now it’s your turn.

6 April 2009

A contributor writes

A contributor writes

the post room

Letters from the Eye postbag: calligraphy by Paul Shaw
One of the more cheering aspects of working on a graphic design magazine is receiving elaborately designed letters through the Royal Mail. When the invoice from contributor Paul Shaw arrived in this envelope last week, it seemed a shame to open it.

4 April 2009

Q&A with Stefanie Schwarz

Q&A with Stefanie Schwarz

q&a

‘OpenType makes typographic subtleties easier to apply now’
Online exclusive. For other interviews on the theme of ‘Who needs design history?' see Eye 68 on the Eye site.

3 April 2009

MadeThought / Typographic Circle

MadeThought / Typographic Circle

simon esterson

Taking the rough with the smooth off the grid
‘New designers come to work with us and I see them spending half a day fannying around with the baseline grid,’ said MadeThought’s Paul Austin to a slightly alarmed audience at the Typographic Circle on Thursday night, writes Simon Esterson. ‘I don't know what that is,’ he added and made it clear he didn’t really care either.

2 April 2009

The Form of the Book 5

The Form of the Book 5

derek birdsall

Dracula, blood-red prints of darkness (with dedicated typefaces)
John Morgan’s meticulous reading of Dracula, Bram Stoker’s classic and complex ‘novel’ (originally published in 1897) results in a golden, golden-section edition, writes Derek Birdsall. As one of the characters repeatedly refers to the (then) modern invention of the typewriter, Morgan has set Mina Harker’s journal entries in a quirky version of typewriter type (Remington, of course!).
 
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