New Media

20 February 2009

In passing: Obit

In passing: Obit

rick poynor

An exclusive, Web-only Critique by Rick Poynor for the Eye site and blog
This American blog-mag reminds us that obituaries are about lives lived. At a certain point in your life, you find yourself drawn to obituaries, writes Rick Poynor. Your own departure, once so far away and impossible seeming, is now a racing certainty. You are more than half way through and people who were middle-aged when you were young – actors, politicians, TV personalities – are showing up in the obituary pages with sobering regularity.

16 February 2009

Video game obsession

Video game obsession

aporva baxi

Aporva Baxi’s expanding collection of Nintendo’s Game & Watch
Remember these? A lot of people that I know seem to have had one, or remember being envious of a school kid who had one, writes Aporva Baxi. Typically, it would be Donkey Kong or Mario Bros. (the most popular). Made by Nintendo, the video-game company currently best known for the Wii and DS

16 January 2009

Us Now documentary

Us Now documentary

kate andrews

Ivo Gormley’s film looks at the political potential of social media
When my mother signed up to Facebook, something extraordinary went through my mind, writes Kate Andrews. What would happen if everybody was part of the same online portal? If boundaries of gender, age, race, religion and culture became void? Questions asked by Us Now, a new film directed by social anthropologist / filmmaker Ivo Gormley.

15 January 2009

DixonBaxi rebrands a TV station

DixonBaxi rebrands a TV station

the video department

Video ‘brand burst’ examples from the article in Eye no. 70
Here, thanks to the joys of embedded links, are some of the ‘brand burst’ animations mentioned in ‘Power of two’, our feature about DixonBaxi (Eye no. 70 vol 18).

16 December 2008

What’s that sound? Who’s that girl?

What’s that sound? Who’s that girl?

Eye’s latest cover features Goldfrapp and Replica
People have been asking what’s on the cover of the latest Eye

28 November 2008

MAP/making’s acid test

MAP/making’s acid test

john l. walters

Music, art and performance in action at the Royal College
What is it about the last Thursday in November in London, asks John L. Walters? There were at least half a dozen events competing for our attention: Sanky doing a D&AD lecture; the launch of the AR’s Emerging Architecture at RIBA; Jost Hochuli at St Bride; the ‘Deface Value’ view at Mutate Britain; and so on . . . The one I opted for was a specially commissioned presentation of live audio-visual work at the Upper Gulbenkian Gallery at the Royal College of Art.

19 November 2008

Guy Le Querrec in Africa

Guy Le Querrec in Africa

john l. walters

Encores for Magnum photographer at the London Jazz Festival
We’re halfway into the London Jazz Festival, and the annual event has already delivered three great audio-visual experiences, writes John L. Walters, including movies, animation – and now some black and white documentary photography.

5 November 2008

Giant Steps

Giant Steps

q&a

Michal Levy: Colour has the same effect it had when we were ‘cavemen’
Previously unpublished ‘beyond the canon’ Q&A with Michal Levy about design history. Levy, now resident in Philadelphia, US, comes from Tel Aviv, Israel.

24 October 2008

The hero of Flight 404

The hero of Flight 404

Synaesthesia, auto-changers and the final trip: Robert Hodgin at FOTB
Flight 404’s Robert Hodgin has worked out the ideal format for his life - as a nicely rendered pie chart, writes John L. Walters. About a third of his time is spent sleeping; another chunk is for eating; and there’s a tiny sliver

20 October 2008

The Independent: too gaudy for words

The Independent: too gaudy for words

An exclusive, Web-only Critique by Rick Poynor for the Eye blog
I always liked the idea of The Independent and there have been a couple of periods, especially after it launched in 1986, when I defected to it from The Guardian. Even so, it has been a long time since I read it regularly, although the campaigning front pages produced since its 2005 redesign by Cases i Associats were eye-catching and occasionally led me to buy it. My main stumbling block is the tabloid page (and that goes for The Times, too). No matter how these two papers might rationalise the switch from broadsheet, the smaller size – also used by the Daily Mail – remains inherently down-market. The Guardian’s brilliantly managed move into new territory with the Berliner format underlined how dowdy, unimaginative and old-fashioned its rivals had become. 
 
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