New Media

26 October 2011

Historical digital

Historical digital

david womack, historical digital

Tools to make or break: designers are redefining type and image at code level
The ability to make tools is what distinguishes designers and other humans from lower forms of life, writes David Womack in Eye 60.

20 October 2011

Historical digital

Historical digital

adrian shaughnessy, historical digital

Adrian Shaughnessey on the rise of laptop aesthetics … from 2003
What are the major stylistic trends in current graphic design? wrote Adrian Shaughnessey in Eye 49 (2003)

29 September 2011

Loose arrangement

Loose arrangement

alexander ecob

A book in a box that obliges readers to interact. Also available as a hectic app
Publisher Visual Editions has established a reputation for publishing titles that exploit the benefits of the books’ visual and physical elements over their digital counterparts (see ‘A nose for type’, in Eye 77 about Apfel’s design for The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman). All the publications on VE’s list, both published and proposed, are titles that play with the expected form of the book, writes Alexander Ecob.

22 September 2011

Type and structure

Type and structure

julia thrift

Revisiting UK design practice 8vo, creators of Octavo magazine
The small, London-based design practice 8vo has an unusual position in the recent history of British graphics wrote Julia Thrift in Eye 37. Formed in 1985 by three then unknown designers, Simon Johnston, Mark Holt and Hamish Muir, a year later it published the first issue of Octavo, a typographic magazine of intense seriousness and overt graphic sophistication.

16 September 2011

Awesomely awesome FOTB

Awesomely awesome FOTB

john l. walters, the events department

Buzzwords and the inspiration of improv at the Brighton codefest
If you were to play buzz-word bingo at Brighton’s ‘Flash on the Beach’, the squares for ‘awesome’, ‘pumped’ and ‘stoked’ would fill up pretty quickly, writes John L. Walters. A wordcloud of all three days’ presentations would bloom with the same words, plus ‘HTML5’, ‘agile’, ‘responsive’, ‘Molehill’ and the inevitable ‘clients’, ‘schedules’ and ‘budgets’.

13 September 2011

Code tripping

Code tripping

john ridpath

Designers and developers come together for Flash on the Beach
This Monday, I helped man Eye’s stand at Flash on the Beach, Brighton – and dipped into as many of the sessions as possible, writes John Ridpath. It was the first day of the conference (see our preview, ‘Code, design and inspire’), and everything kicked off with a keynote from Adobe. Among the company’s series of presentations, we saw a fast-paced demonstration of Edge, a new Flash-like tool that creates animated Web content using HTML5, CSS3 and JavaScript. With Apple’s notorious decision to drop Flash support on iPhones and iPads, it will be interesting to see what part Adobe will play in the future of the web.

8 September 2011

Historical digital #3

Historical digital #3

historical digital

Grow your own. More digital food for thought … made with Processing
Here are some more examples of digital work from ‘Grow your own’, the article about Processing featured in Eye 65. See ‘Historical digital #2’, yesterday’s Eye blog post.

7 September 2011

Historical digital #2

Historical digital #2

historical digital, luke prowse

Grow your own. Generating unique images with Processing.
In Eye 65, we published ‘Grow your own’, an article by Luke Prowse that was accompanied by several examples of designers and artists who were discovering new, creative uses of the open-source tool Processing.

1 September 2011

Code, design and inspire

Code, design and inspire

the events department

Gearing up for this year’s Flash on the Beach in Brighton
Flash on the Beach is only a few weeks away, and we’ll be manning an Eye stand in the breaks – and blogging and Tweeting our way through some of the talks and presentations. 

15 August 2011

Make, do, mend

Make, do, mend

john ridpath

The revolutionary power of new micro-manufacturing technologies
Last Wednesday’s Future Human event explored the recent expansion of one-off manufacturing and rapid prototyping technologies, setting out with a bold claim: ‘Over the next ten years, we’re going to see digital economics upturn industrial production and the physical world of “things”’. Of course, there’s nothing new about micro-manufacturing, or bespoke one-offs, writes John Ridpath.
 
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