Typography

10 May 2011

Type Tuesday

Type Tuesday

type tuesday

Back with a flourish. Christian Schwartz talks swashes – part one
The twentieth century was not a good time for swashes, often described as the ‘curly bits added on to make type look fancy’, writes Christian Schwartz in Eye 62. During the previous four centuries swashes were often

5 May 2011

A right royal show

A right royal show

liz farrelly

Middle England and middle managers under a steaming pile of Modern Cloth
How often do you walk round an exhibition laughing out loud, asks Liz Farrelly? Not because you can’t believe what you’re seeing, but genuinely because framed on the wall are a bunch of very funny jokes, pointing out the absurdities of ‘modern’ life, and played out by a cast of the simplest, hand-drawn ‘characters’.

4 May 2011

Alphabetical order

Alphabetical order

alexander ecob

Limited-edition book explores Peter Blake’s unpublished letterforms
Victorian publishing values go hand-in-hand with Victorian type in a special book that showcases the alphabets of artist-illustrator-designer Peter Blake, writes Alexander Ecob. For publisher Douglas Wilson, the story goes back a long way.

3 May 2011

Type Tuesday

Type Tuesday

type tuesday

Visions of Joanna: Mark Thomson on Eric Gill’s Essay on Typography
It took me a while to find this book, writes Mark Thomson in Eye 62. Not that it is hard to buy a copy – it has hardly been out of print since 1931. But to find this book, this particular copy, was tough.

26 April 2011

Type Tuesday

Type Tuesday

type tuesday

Electrifying the alphabet. Wim Crouwel’s experiments in letterforms
The rapid advances in data-processing that revolutionised office work from the mid-1960s onwards – and later invaded everyday life – created special challenges for type designers. With electronic typewriters and microcomputers came the need for electronic fonts, both to translate data into electrical signals understandable by machines, and to transmit information between humans and machines via electronic displays writes Sarah Owens in Eye 62.

19 April 2011

Type Tuesday

Type Tuesday

type tuesday

Christian Schwartz and Paul Barnes deep in the archives: Antique Olive
Roger Excoffon’s Antique Olive (1962-66) is a perfect example of a typeface that has suffered from its context. It is by no means a bad design – in fact, it is a brilliant piece of work – but it has become so over-used (and often badly) that it is ripe for rediscovery, wrote Christian Schwartz and Paul Barnes in Eye 75.

14 April 2011

Mapping it up

Mapping it up

alexander ecob

Embrace the inner cartographer of artists and graphic designers
I’ve yet to meet a designer who doesn’t harbour a fondness for maps, writes Alexander Ecob.

12 April 2011

Type Tuesday

Type Tuesday

type tuesday

Matthew Carter explains how he came to design his first wood type
The positive / negative aspect of type is always in a type designer’s mind, writes Matthew Carter in Eye 76. This may be particularly true for a designer who has been trained, as I was, in punchcutting, a technique that works  on the space – the letter is what is left over at the end.

4 April 2011

Exquisite discourse

Exquisite discourse

hamish thompson

Poet meets graphic artist meets type designer, and the consequence is …
A graphic artist and a typeface designer, working blind to each other, design two-word typographic postcards illustrating a poet’s turn of phrase, writes Hamish Thompson.

30 March 2011

Bravo, Charlie

Bravo, Charlie

alexander ecob

Playing with phonetic typography at the Kemistry gallery
Hot on the heels of their intriguing exhibition of Saul Bass posters, the Kemistry gallery (a fitting venue for phonetics) plays host to the ICAO Phonetic Spelling Alphabet as interpreted by Eat Sleep Work / Play, Inventory Studio (one of the practices behind ‘The Art of Conversation’) & Julia, writes Alexander Ecob.
 
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