Typography

20 December 2012

Lay out – speak out

Lay out – speak out

A letterpress conference at Fleet Street’s St Bride Library aimed to focus our attention on content
‘Something to say’, a letterpress conference organised by Catherine Dixon & Rose Gridneff at St Bride Library, aimed to focus attention on what is being said, writes Stephen Barrett. In doing so they made a case for letterpress as both a reminder of our typographic heritage and as a valid means of communication today.

10 December 2012

Sun-cheese wheel-ode

Sun-cheese wheel-ode

Dom Sylvester Houédard’s 1968 concrete poetry tribute to fellow poet Ken Cox is a double spiral of hand-set type, mysteriously linked by the sport of cheese rolling. Fraser Muggeridge explains.
The letterpress printed concrete poem designed by Dom Sylvester Houédard first caught my interest because of its use of the Flaxman typeface, designed by Edward Wright (1912-88) for the International Concrete Poetry Festival in 1967, writes Fraser Muggeridge.

22 November 2012

Noted #46

Noted #46

Schwitters, typewriting, wood type, the future Detroit Printing Plant and the United Stats of America
This past Friday the last British-made typewriter, the CM-1000, left the Brother factory in Wrexham for London’s Science Museum collection. Eye received a tiny, tactile, hand-printed snake book from Barrie Tullett of The Caseroom Press, wrapped in a typewritten paper sleeve.

21 November 2012

Hand-made in Cambodia

Hand-made in Cambodia

Painted signs enliven the streetscapes of Kratie, a sleepy provincial capital in North East Cambodia.
Cambodia is a country awash with hand-painted signs, writes Sam Roberts. They form an integral part of the streetscape but most visitors barely even notice them.

14 November 2012

Jazz in print

Jazz in print

Matt Willey’s sumptuous brochure for UK radio station JazzFM evokes a golden age of magazine and LP sleeve art direction.
Jazz and radio came of age around the same time, the 1920s, when ‘physical music’ was clunky and expensive, writes John L. Walters.

13 November 2012

Type in Wapping

Type in Wapping

Pencil to Pixel opens up Monotype’s archive of typographic history, from artwork to artefacts
The ‘Pencil to Pixel’ exhibition, which opens this Friday at Metropolitan Wharf in London, gives visitors is a chance to see some of Monotype’s extensive archive of original artwork, type drawings, arcane artefacts (including justification drums and ships’ curves) and publications.

7 November 2012

Something to say

Something to say

The current vogue for letterpress is more than mere retro-nostalgia, writes Catherine Dixon in the run-up to Friday’s St Bride conference.
Letterpress is everywhere, writes Catherine Dixon (co-organiser of ‘Letterpress: Something to Say’).

2 November 2012

Graphic design history to boot

Graphic design history to boot

Everything must go when Ian Anderson sells off the contents of The Designers Republic (TDR) archive in its Car Booty Affair in Sheffield.
At what point does the ephemera that is graphic design become collectable? When does a piece of paper become an artefact? These are questions Ian Anderson of TDR makes us think about as he holds a retrospective exhibition of the studio’s work in the form of a car boot sale at the ‘Month of Sundays’ gallery in Sheffield.

29 October 2012

Giants of the visual imagination

Giants of the visual imagination

While others struggle with ‘personal expression’, the Vignellis prove that a simple approach and focus makes great design, writes Quentin Newark.
   Quentin Newark writes:   As I was designing the catalogue for the Tate Modern exhibition ‘Albers and Moholy-Nagy’ (2006), a book hefty with designs for adverts, glass paintings, books, chairs, exhibitions, logos, films and colour studies, I thought: we don’t make them like that any more. Creative minds that can flit between disciplines without inhibition.

26 October 2012

Noted #45

Noted #45

Sneaker art, Coverthink on news design, Kerouac, Lubalin, letterpress and a letter from the Gentle Author.
This week in Noted: branding, editorial design, Kerouac’s scroll, letterpress, more Herb Lubalin and an illustrative alphabet from 1836.
 
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