Visual Culture

20 July 2015

Free art, free dance, free form

Free art, free dance, free form

Artist Doug Aitken’s ‘Station to Station’ fills the Barbican with art, dance and design
‘Station to Station: A 30 Day Happening’, at the Barbican until 26 July, is a project conceived by Californian artist Doug Aitken which enlists the talents of 100 artists and includes 50 performances and twenty residencies.

15 July 2015

City of signs

City of signs

Artist Alida Sayer witnesses a collision of ancient and hyper-modern in Andong, South Korea
The city of Andong, though widely considered the bastion of ‘traditional’ Korea, possesses a distinctively perpendicular aesthetic, writes Alida Sayer.

4 July 2015

Boxes of delight

Boxes of delight

Joseph Cornell was an avid collector who crafted a playful universe all his own. His fragile creations are on display at the Royal Academy, London
Collecting things in boxes has been a popular pastime for many people, from fossil hunters and natural history enthusiasts to A. A. Milne’s fictional Christopher Robin, who famously kept Alexander Beetle in a match-box, writes Clare Walters.

26 June 2015

Exhibition ephemera

Exhibition ephemera

Graphic designers collect all kinds of ephemera, from boxes crammed with flyers to pinboards covered in cards and clippings. The latest book from Occasional Papers – the imprint founded by designer Sara De Bondt and curator Antony Hudek in 2008 – is a testament to this impulse, writes Elizabeth Glickfeld.

18 June 2015

The man who branded Sainsbury’s

The man who branded Sainsbury’s

Sheffield designer Leonard Beaumont created the UK supermarket’s first postwar identity
Sheffield-born Leonard Beaumont (1891-1986) was the graphic designer who gave Sainsbury’s supermarkets and products a consistent identity in the postwar era.

8 June 2015

Ghosts of the ghetto

Ghosts of the ghetto

Photographer Henryk Ross risked his life to bear witness to the Holocaust. By Sarah Snaith
The Art Gallery of Ontario is showing a selection of salvaged photographs taken by Jewish photographer Henryk Ross in the Łódź Ghetto in Poland during the Second World War. ‘Memory Unearthed’ offers a rare glimpse into Jewish life during this horrific period in history, showing both everyday life and human suffering, writes Sarah Snaith.

2 June 2015

Retrogressive

Retrogressive

An archive of historical, ‘aw shucks’ clip art shows a clipped version of history, says Steven McCarthy
One afternoon about fifteen years ago, my University of Minnesota office phone rang, writes Steven McCarthy. It was an attorney at law, claiming to represent The Gap, the clothing retailer.

29 May 2015

London’s American poster king

London’s American poster king

McKnight Kauffer’s Modernist posters for London Underground go under the hammer next week. By Graham Twemlow
In the design canon, from a contemporary perspective, the American-born poster artist Edward McKnight Kauffer (1890-1954) remains an enigmatic figure. Yet in the 1920s and 1930s he was the most celebrated graphic designer in the UK, writes Graham Twemlow.

21 May 2015

Stuck in the middle of Thatcherism

Stuck in the middle of Thatcherism

Chris Dorley-Brown’s ‘time travel’ photobook Drivers in the 1980s is reviewed by art director (and car blogger) Roger Browning
Not so much Drivers in the 1980s as East London drivers on Wednesday 20 May 1987. Yes, I wondered why, too, writes Roger Browning.

13 May 2015

Beyond selfish

Beyond selfish

Could Selfiecity’s systems of visual analysis one day become a force for the common good?
‘Selfies’ are a cultural phenomenon, and it seems you cannot move for people taking them, writes Noel Douglas.
 
 1 2 3 >  Last ›