Reviews

2 September 2011

Notes on a betrayal

Notes on a betrayal

brendan dawes

A brief encounter with Monocle’s luxury stationery range
As a self-confessed stationery geek who gladly pays money every month to receive stationery goods from around the world via radandhungry.com, being asked to review two notebooks from the Monocle stationery range was like an alcoholic being told that Jack Daniels would like to send you a free case of Old No. 7, writes Brendan Dawes.

30 August 2011

Type Tuesday

Type Tuesday

type tuesday

Lust and likeability #5: Stormtype’s ‘over-the-top’, ‘edible’ Jannon
More words about type in this critique of Jannon by Jan Middendorp, Petra Černe Oven, Deborah Littlejohn and Mark Thomson. Jannon. František Štorm, Stormtype As early as 1925, Beatrice Warde (writing as Paul Beaujon) pointed out that  several types used as models for Garamond revivals were in fact cut by an artist who worked some 70 years later, Jean  Jannon. It took a maverick designer from Prague to finally issue a digital revival under that later master’s name. Mark Thomson The curiosities of contrast in the roman and the angles in the italic give this type a lively feeling. It is interesting to compare it with Adobe Garamond – it is almost the polar opposite. Where Adobe Garamond is smooth, suave almost, this Jannon is nervy, slightly hyperactive. The  consequence is that Adobe Garamond pops up  everywhere, whereas I  think Jannon has more specific uses. It really looks as though it has to  be printed on the right kind of paper – uncoated and not white. Petra Černe Oven Most people’s reaction to  Stormtype’s Jannon is  that it is ‘over the top’, but in my part of the world we like exaggeration. Strong, late-Baroque elements seem almost too rich, and the uneven italic slant causes letters to behave like court jesters. I worry what OpenType’s multiple possibilities might do to  this rich and diverse typeface – it certainly must be handled with great feeling for wonderful, well thought out details, alternates and ornaments. I would use it for a very special project. Deborah Littlejohn Five males ranked the more reserved Jannon number one, tying with Verlag, and six placed it  in  the number two spot. Jannon is almost as delicate as Odile – and it  is just as elegant – but Odile was placed fourth among male respondents. Jannon must be the ‘man’s man’s feminine font’: one male respondent called it ‘gorgeous’ while another described it as ‘edible’. Twelve slotted it in the top third, making Jannon the number one font overall among male respondents. Jannon did not fare so well with the ladies, who ranked it sixth overall with five of them putting it in the bottom tier. No other typeface on the list rivals Jannon’s textural beauty and rhythm – especially when set in big bookish blocks of text. Jan Middendorp Among an avalanche of revivals and ‘re-interpretations’, Štorm’s stand out for their brilliance, liveliness and sensitivity. Jannon is  part of a series of historically inspired seriffed faces to which his  outrageous Biblon and Serapion also belong. Jannon is on the more serious side of the spectrum. Its ‘Modern’ variety, in which proportions have been adopted to today’s reading habits, is one of  the finest (and least boring) Garamond-type text faces to have hit the virtual shelves lately. See ‘Storm: Living history’ by Petra Černe Oven in Eye 50. Visit Stormtype.com to see a wide range of typefaces. You can buy Jannon here. Type Tuesday is our new weekly column on typography and type design, featuring a mixture of brand new articles and material from the extensive Eye archive. For more Type Tuesday articles, click here. Lust and likeability was originally published in Eye 67, Spring 2008. Eye is the world’s most beautiful and collectable graphic design journal, published quarterly for professional designers, students and anyone interested in critical, informed writing about graphic design and visual culture. It’s available from all good design bookshops and online at the Eye shop, where you can buy subscriptions, back issues and single copies of the latest issue. The latest issue is Eye 80.

10 August 2011

This city’s made of light

This city’s made of light

catherine dixon

24 hours of (normal) London life, told by The Light Surgeons in São Paulo
The Light Surgeons are a London-based collective of multimedia artists set up by Christopher Thomas Allen in 1995, and it was he who introduced both premiere performances of their 35-minute-long audiovisual performance LDN-Redux in São Paulo on 23 July 2011, writes Catherine Dixon.

29 July 2011

Visual sonata

Visual sonata

john l. walters

The Quay Brothers create an intimate spectacle for Bartók and beyond.
Film-makers might spend a lot of time and effort trying to make a set look as dilapidated as Wilton’s Music Hall, the once-disreputable Victorian (built in 1858) venue in Wapping, writes John L. Walters.

29 June 2011

Wim in space

Wim in space

jessica jenkins

Crouwel at the Design Museum – a voyage of discovery into form-making
The Design Museum’s Wim Crouwel retrospective offers a voyage of discovery into form-making – the decorative overlays of orange and blue Crouwel ‘C’ forms that embrace the building’s façade are a prelude to the Dutch designer’s typographic ardour, writes Jessica Jenkins.

27 June 2011

Labyrinth of magazines

Labyrinth of magazines

john l. walters

Segovia’s Enformato brings together European design / visual culture titles.
Earlier this year, the newly refurbished Palacio Quintanar in Segovia, northern Spain, held an exhibition of nearly four dozen European design / visual culture magazines, (writes Eye editor John L. Walters) including Experimenta and Visual (Spain), Etapes (France), Typo (Czech Republic), Attitude (Portugal), Colors (Italy) and Eye.

19 June 2011

Andmoreagain

Andmoreagain

john l. walters, simon esterson

Web typography comes of age at Brighton’s Ampersand conference
Is the humble ampersand a symbol for our additive times? During the morning sessions for Friday’s Ampersand conference in Brighton, writes John L. Walters, we were reminded that design is no longer a matter of either / ors – ‘print or Web’; ‘Mac or Windows’; ‘word or image’ – but that we have to keep adding: glyphs, weights, languages, employees, knowledge … and ideas. All four speakers – Vincent Connare, Jason Santa Maria, Jon Tan and Jonathan Hoefler (top) – brought their intellects to bear on serious matters with a light touch.

15 June 2011

Crowded house of animation

Crowded house of animation

john l. walters

‘Watch Me Move’ at the Barbican shows the medium’s waking dreams
Part art show, part spectacle, part viewing library, ‘Watch Me Move’, the new Barbican Gallery show (which opened today), tackles the complex, surreal and visually bountiful history of animation with the clear-eyed confidence of Buzz Lightyear setting out into space, writes John L. Walters.

13 June 2011

Type Tuesday

Type Tuesday

type tuesday

Lust and likeability #2: talking about Rayuela by Alejandro Lo Celso
Rayuela (‘Hopscotch’) is  a  novel by Argentine writer Julio Cortázar in which the reader is invited to jump back and forth between chapters. The typeface of the same name, developed while Alejandro Lo Celso was completing the type design Master’s course in Reading, is an homage to Cortázar’s playfulness.

7 June 2011

Type Tuesday

Type Tuesday

type tuesday

Lust and likeability: an informal jury puts type into words: #1 Odile
Elegant, chunky, laugh-out-loud, nervy, bookish, perfumed … our informal jury puts type into words with a typeface critique by Jan Middendorp, John Belknap, Petra Černe Oven, Deborah Littlejohn and Mark Thomson. This is the first of several extracts from ‘Lust and likeability’, first published in Eye 67.
 
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