Anne-Marie Conway

Recent articles by Anne-Marie Conway

The pop artist as graphic designer

Issue 78, Winter 2010

Review

Stars and stripes, hearts and targets – if Peter Blake’s name is not the first…

Now you see it, now you don’t

Issue 65, Autumn 2007

Review

When you think about it – and Gerard Unger has spend four decades thinking about…

Charts change minds

Issue 82, Winter 2012

Feature

Description of the slave ship Brookes 1788

Credits where due

Issue 80, Summer 2011

Feature

Momoco’s TV and film titles mix animation and typography to distinctive (and award-winning) effect…

Lady with the diagram

Issue 82, Winter 2012

Feature

Florence Nightingale on Crimean War mortality, 1858

Recent blog posts by Anne-Marie Conway

King’s Cross in Gotham

24 December 2012

Typographic Christmas decorations cheer weary travellers between station and Central Saint Martins
Just outside the new entrance to King’s Cross station in London, the shiny red hoardings concealing the construction work have been dotted with foot-high snowflake transfers since the beginning of December, writes Anne-Marie Conway.

Lady with the diagram

25 June 2012

Florence Nightingale on Crimean War mortality, 1858 – infodesign in Eye 82
The vision of Florence Nightingale (1820-1910) as ‘The Lady with the Lamp’, doing ward rounds in her Crimean war hospital, is embedded in the British psyche, writes Anne-Marie Conway in Eye 82.

Charts change minds

13 June 2012

Description of the slave ship Brookes, 1788 – infodesign history in Eye 82
Eighteenth-century abolitionists used every propaganda tool in the book, but one of their most widely circulated visual aids was an innovative diagram of the Liverpool slave ship Brookes, first published in 1788, writes Anne-Marie Conway in Eye 82.

Matters of life and death

21 September 2011

Celebrating photojournalism at Visa pour l’Image, Perpignan
Plumes of black smoke rise to the right as you gaze over the river that runs through the centre of Perpignan. To your left, stands a man in fatigues, a rifle over each shoulder. In the distance, a young woman wrapped in a blanket surveys the rubble of her home. But apocalypse has not struck the south of France: these are banners advertising Visa pour l’Image, which claims to be the world’s largest festival devoted to photojournalism.